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SOLAR…. CORRELATIONS GRAPHED

I will collect information on solar variables
Find data that can be correlated with the suns variables

PLEASE CLICK ON THE TITLE TO LOAD FURTHER POSTS AND COMMENTS WHICH ARE AT THE BASE OF THIS PAGE

THIS GRAPH CORRELATES THE SOLAR SUN SPOT CYCLE WITH NEUTRON BOMBARDMENT( COSMIC RAYS)

SUNS SPOTS  vs NEUTRON COUNT

AS SUNSPOTS INCREASE…….NEUTRON BOMBARDMENT DECREASES

SOURCE
http://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/thule-greenland-neutron-monitor.jpg?w=640&h=432

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40 comments on “SOLAR…. CORRELATIONS GRAPHED

  1. SUNSPOT NUMBER and 10BE superimposed .on a time line…TIME SERIES 1934 -2011

    Looks like a correlation exists
    The number of sunspots affect 10Be deposition
    However not exact
    10Be deposition amplitude does not vary proportionally with sun spot number, although generally follows the cycle
    The 10BE deposition is quite a predicatble cycle with almost no variation in peaks and troughs?
    10Be deposition sometimes lags the sunspot decline and some times it doesn’t

    from ‘sparks’ graph
    This is what l considered from your graph ‘sparks’

    The number of sunspots affect 10Be deposition
    However not exact
    10Be deposition amplitude does not vary proportionally with sun spot number, although generally follows the cycle
    The 10BE deposition is quite a predicatble cycle with almost no variation in peaks and troughs?
    10Be deposition sometimes lags the sunspot decline and some times it doesn’t

    Why doesn’t 10BE vary in deposition with sun spot number increase
    10BE generally follows the SSN cycle but does not follow the amplitude of the SSN cycle

    So 10BE not affected by more or less sunspots?

    but has greatest variation in deposition when solar cycle length is shorter

    Suggesting climate is more linked to solar cycle length then the number of sunspots

    10Be and sunspots time series
    link

    sourced from
    http://thetempestspark.files.wordpress.com/2014/

  2. Research by DU 2011
    Topic
    Sunspots and the correlation with geomagnetism (aa)

    The relationship between aa and sunspots is not a simple linear relationship but a integral response function

    aa and sunspots by Du 2011
    DU..2011..Some notes l took..
    Integral response model 10
    Increase of aa over the 20th century
    longer lag times of aa to sunspots at solar cycle maximum than at minimum
    aa depends not only on the present sunspots but also on past values
    aa has a 11 yr variation similar to solar activity
    The geomagnetic activity is the result of variable current systems formed in the magnetosphere and ionosphere as a consequence of the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere
    The geomagnetic activity has been found to be well correlated with the solar wind speed
    Solar flares dominate the rising phase
    recurrent geomagnetic activity is more frequent during the declining phase or at the minimum of solar cycle
    During the last years of a cycle, the geomagnetic activity results from recurrent storms, fast solar winds and coronal holes
    the magnetosphere has a significant linear linear response to the solar wind drivers
    In the declining phase of a solar cycle the dynamics of the magnetosphere exhibit a non linear behaviour
    Increasing occurrence of high sped solar wind streams during the declining phase of the solar cycle
    has been used to explain the decreasing trend in the correlation between aa and sunspots over time
    The aa index lags behind sunspots around a 2-3 yrs around a solar cycle maximum
    while around a solar cycle minimum the lag time is small about one year
    The aa index is strongly correlated with sunspots at the rising phase of a solar cycle while the correlation at the declining phase is weak and decreases with time
    The change in the aa is caused by an increase in solar magnetic activity over the last century
    The sharp increase in lag time in cycle 14 is mainly due to the higher maxima in cycles 12 and 13than in cycle 14
    The longer the time interval of sunspots preceding aa the less its contribution
    The correlation between aa and rising phase of sunspots is strong
    The correlation between aa and declining phase is weak
    Du’s model says we should take into acount the current sunspots phase AND the previous phase
    The increasing in the values of sunspots around solar maxima contributes increasing negative correlation of aa with sunspots at the following declining phase
    This leads to a descending trend in the correlation of aa with sunspots
    Increasing trend in the lag time of aa to sunspots is also due to increasing sunspots over the last century
    solar activity affects the geomagnetic activity in the subsequent time period of about 38 months ( ~3yrs)

    an odd numbered cycle tends to have a stronger correlation of aa with sunspots than even numbered cycle
    stamper 1999
    the solar wind speed peaks strongly in the declining phase of even numbered cycles
    —————
    conclusion
    There are 2 main sources of geomagnetic activity
    coronal mass injections in phase with the sunspot cycle
    high speed solar wind streams is out of phase with the sun spot cycle
    The relationship between aa and sunspots is not a simple linear relationship but a integral response function

  3. VUKCEVIC
    How this for an excellent piece of work by Dr Vukcevic

    I have termed HIS illustration the SOLAR FLOWER
    It shows 3 differing intensities of solar activity close to 100yr for one circle

    solar flower by VUKCEVIC

    Suggesting that there are 2 layers
    Fast and slow sun each layer is one phase of the De Vries cycle ( 1/2 a DeVries = ~100 yr)One fast (~100yr)and one slow phase (~ 100yr) = one de Vries cycle of ~200 yr

    1/2 a de vries is ~ 100 yrs has 9 petals . Each petal represents a Schwabbe cycle and is one of the 2 layers of the solar flower
    One layer is the slow sun, the other is fast sun

    The 2 layers of the solar flower are two halves of the de vries or one de Vries cycle of about 200 yrs

    Sort of like a see saw every 100 yrs

    http://www.vukcevic.co.uk/

    One AMO cycle = 6 of the solar petals. So one petal is one and a half AMO cycles. Running at fast sun.

    and then shifts gears to another 6 solar petals ( 1/2 AMO cycles), this time running at a slow phase .

    The 2 layers of the solar flower = 18 petals or 18 schwabbe cycles

    9 ‘gear’ fast sun and then switch to 9 ‘gear’ slow sun

    The 2 layers of the solar flower also = 3 AMO cycles or one de Vries cycle

  4. RAY TOMES
    http://cyclesresearchinstitute.wordpress.com/2010/08/06/hale-sunspot-cycle-in-english-temperature-record/
    “In my experience there is a cycle present in a number of different things that is close to twice Jupiter’s period and definitely different from Hale cycle. To understand more about this please see my page on Harmonics theory at http://ray.tomes.biz/maths.html
    ———————————————————————–
    http://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2010/07/31/the-sun-talks-to-the-trees-too/

    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/05/08/cycling-in-central-england/

  5. geomagnetic aa index plotted against global temperature
    TIME SERIES

    aa index vs global temp time series

    Solar variability and climate change: Geomagnetic aa index and global surface temperature

    E. W. Cliver1, V. Boriakoff1 andJ. Feynman2

    Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012

  6. Thanks to Salvatore DEL PRETE for this research link

    22 Year Patterns in the Relationship of Sunspot Number and Tilt Angle to Cosmic-Ray Intensity

    E. W. Cliver
    Air Force Research Laboratory, edward.cliver@hanscom.af.mil
    and
    A. G. Ling
    Radex, Incorporated, 3 Preston Court, Bedford, MA 01730; alan.ling@hanscom.af.mil

    ; published 2001 April 17

    ABSTRACT extract (one paragraph only here)
    A comparison of 27 day averages of the sunspot number with the Galactic cosmic-ray intensity observed at Climax reveals a 22 yr pattern. The 11 yr cosmic-ray cycle appears to lag the sunspot cycle by ∼1 yr for odd-numbered cycles such as 19 and 21. …
    continue
    http://iopscience.iop.org/1538-4357/551/2/L189/fulltext/

  7. http://hockeyschtick.blogspot.com.au/2014/07/new-paper-finds-high-correlation.html

    Periodicities of solar activity and the surface temperature variation of the Earth and their correlations

    ZHAO XinHua*, FENG XueShang*

    State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China

    wavelet transform solar

    Abstract:

    Based on the well-calibrated systematiCmeasurements of sunspot numbers, the reconstructed data of the total solar irradiance (TSI), and the observed anomalies of the Earth’s averaged surface temperature (global, ocean, land), this paper investigates the periodicities of both solar activity and the Earth’s temperature variation as well as their correlations on the time scale of centuries using the wavelet and cross correlation analysis techniques. The main results are as follows. (1) Solar activities (including sunspot number and TSI) have four major periodic components higher than the 95% significance level of white noise during the period of interest, i.e. 11-year period, 50-year period, 100-year period, and 200-year period. The global temperature anomalies of the Earth have only one major periodic component of 64.3-year period, which is close to the 50-year cycle of solar activity. (2) Significant resonant periodicities between solar activity and the Earth’s temperature are focused on the 22- and 50-year period. (3) Correlations between solar activity and the surface temperature of the Earth on the long time scales are higher than those on the short time scales. As far as the sunspot number is concerned, its correlation coefficients to the Earth temperature are 0.31-0.35 on the yearly scale, 0.58-0.70 on the 11-year running mean scale, and 0.64-0.78 on the 22-year running mean scale. TSI has stronger correlations to the Earth temperature than sunspot number. (4) During the past 100 years, solar activities display a clear increasing tendency that corresponds to the global warming of the Earth (including land and ocean) very well. Particularly, the ocean temperature has a slightly higher correlation to solar activity than the land temperature. All these demonstrate that solar activity has a non-negligible forcing on the temperature change of the Earth on the time scale of centuries.”

  8. Influence of the Schwabe/Hale solar cycles on climate change during the Maunder Minimum

    ⦁ Hiroko Miyaharaa1, Yusuke Yokoyamaa2a3a4 and Yasuhiko T. Yamaguchia2a3a4 (published 2009)
    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7277700&fileId=S1743921309993048
    ⦁ AUG 2009
    ⦁ Abstract. We have examined the variation of carbon-14 content in annual tree rings, and investigated the transitions of the characteristics of the Schwabe/Hale (11-year/22-year) solar and cosmic-ray cycles during the last 1200 years, focusing mainly on the Maunder and Spoerer minima and the early Medieval Maximum Period. It has been revealed that the mean length of the Schwabe/Hale cycles changes associated with the centennial-scale variation of solar activity level. The mean length of Schwabe cycle had been ∼14 years during the Maunder Minimum, while it was ∼9 years during the early Medieval Maximum Period. We have also found that climate proxy record shows cyclic variations similar to stretching/shortening Schwabe/Hale solar cycles in time, suggesting that both Schwabe and Hale solar cycles are playing important role in climate change. In this paper, we review the nature of Schwabe and Hale cycles of solar activity and cosmic-ray flux during the Maunder Minimum and their possible influence on climate change. We suggest that the Hale cycle of cosmic rays are amplified during the grand solar minima and thus the influence of cosmic rays on climate change is prominently recognizable during such periods.

    “————————-
    the length of the Hale cycle detected in the reconstructed temperature is also stretched to be ∼28 years.
    As has been discussed in our previous paper (Miyahara et al., 2008), the phase of the Hale cycle in climate change is reversed after the Maunder Minimum as well as that of cosmic rays, and the cooling is found to occur especially around the cycle minima of polarity positive. The length of climate Hale cycle also recovers to 22 years.

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