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KNOWN FLOODS IN THE BRISBANE & BREMER RIVER BASIN

EXCELLENT LINK HERE DESERVING OF A PAGE ALL ITS OWN
Plenty more to read! from this link.
(PLEASE CLICK ON THE TITLE TO LOAD ALL FURTHER ENTRIES IN THE COMMENT SECTOR BELOW)
http://www.bom.gov.au/qld/flood/fld_history/brisbane_history.shtml

known floods brisbane

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3 comments on “KNOWN FLOODS IN THE BRISBANE & BREMER RIVER BASIN

  1. Thanks to a weatherzone forum contributor for this excellent documentary and report on the 2011 Brisbane floods

    https://www.riskfrontiers.com/pdf/water-03-01149.pdf

    The 2011 Brisbane Floods: Causes, Impacts and Implications</h3
    Robin C. van den Honert * and John McAneney
    Risk Frontiers, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia; E-Mail: john.mcaneney@mq.edu.au
    * Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: rob.vandenhonert@mq.edu.au;

    ABSTRACT
    "Abstract: On 13th January 2011 major flooding occurred throughout most of the Brisbane
    River catchment, most severely in Toowoomba and the Lockyer Creek catchment (where
    23 people drowned), the Bremer River catchment and in Brisbane, the state capital of
    Queensland. Some 56,200 claims have been received by insurers with payouts totalling
    $2.55 billion. This paper backgrounds weather and climatic factors implicated in the
    flooding and the historical flood experience of Brisbane. We examine the time history of
    water releases from the Wivenhoe dam, which have been accused of aggravating damage
    downstream. The dam was built in response to even worse flooding in 1974 and now
    serves as Brisbane’s main water supply. In our analysis, the dam operators made
    sub-optimal decisions by neglecting forecasts of further rainfall and assuming a ‘no
    rainfall’ scenario. Questions have also been raised about the availability of insurance cover
    for riverine flood, and the Queensland government’s decision not to insure its
    infrastructure. These and other questions have led to Federal and State government
    inquiries. We argue that insurance is a form of risk transfer for the residual risk following
    risk management efforts and cannot in itself be a solution for poor land-use planning. With
    this in mind, we discuss the need for risk-related insurance premiums to encourage flood
    risk mitigating behaviours by all actors, and for transparency in the availability of flood
    maps. Examples of good flood risk management to arise from this flood are described."

    Love this graph showing the relationship to a a positive SOI ( as high as +20) and two of the biggest Brisbane floods 1974 and 2011

    source
    https://www.riskfrontiers.com/pdf/water-03-01149.pdf

  2. 1974
    Thanks to pkgjmg’ from WZforum for digging up this interesting info on the 1974 Brisbane floods

    “just found this information in regards to rainfall in Brisbane, 1974 – it’s probably been seen time and time again, but as you can see brisbane received 300mm in 24 hours! …

    http://www.bom.gov.au/lam/climate/levelthree/c20thc/flood7.htm

    On top of all this came tropical cyclone “Wanda”, which moved ashore north of Brisbane on Thursday 24 January, producing relatively little wind damage, but sending down enormous quantities of rain over the Australia Day weekend.

    In Brisbane, intensifying rain throughout Friday dumped over 300mm within 24 hours. In three days (ended 9am 27th) the Queensland capital received 580mm, with even heavier falls over river catchments near the city (1,300mm in five days at Mt Glorious).

    Wanda floodThe first houses were washed away along Enoggera Creek early on the 26th. As rivers continued to rise, many more were lost. The Bremer river peaked at Ipswich on the Sunday, and the Brisbane River peaked early on Tuesday; both at their highest levels since the disastrous floods of 1893.

    Fourteen people were drowned, some trapped in offices by the rising waters.

    TC wanda 1974. House submerged

    Floodwaters completely submerge a house during the cyclone “Wanda” floods, 27 January 1974 (photo courtesy of the Brisbane Courier-Mail).

  3. Some more info from ‘locke’ from WZforum
    “But to put some perspective on the 1893 situation, Crohamhurst in the Somerset catchment recorded 907mm in a 24 hr period. According to eye witness reports a 15.2m wall of water was reported in the Brisbane River Gorge just below where Somerset dam now sits.

    The 4 day total at Crohamhurst for that event was 1964mm with coastal falls nearby ranging from 1200-1800mm. Further inland and South the falls were in the 200-600mm range and the falls in the Bremer catchment less than 200mm.

    The rainfall was initiated by a TC crossing at Yeppoon which interacting with a deep layered trough triggered an ECL that crossed the coast between Fraser Island and Brisbane.”
    ———–
    and some more from the BOM site
    http://www.bom.gov.au/qld/flood/fld_history/brisbane_history.shtml

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